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Projects > Coore & Crenshaw

Bandon Trails at Bandon Dunes Resort
Bandon, OR Ė Opened 2005 (18 Holes)
www.bandondunesgolf.com

Critical acclaim and sites directly on the Pacific Ocean for the first two courses at Bandon Dunes left Coore & Crenshaw with big shoes to fill while building the third course, known as Bandon Trails. Unlike Bandon Dunes and Pacific Dunes, Trails is removed from the water. However, in addition to holes in the dunesland seen on the other spectacular layouts at Bandon, there are two environments unique to Bandon Trails. Holes routed through coastal meadow and temperate rainforest provide the golfer a journey through rare and distinct habitats.

After opening with two holes in the dunes, the golfer heads east into the meadow. Longer slopes and wooly vegetation lend the meadow holes a less turbulent feel than is often seen on seaside venues. This land, nonetheless, provides more than enough elevation change and strategic opportunity. Beginning at the seventh, the course turns a corner to holes tucked behind an enormous coastal ridge. Amid a forest of spruce, fir, and sculptural madrone trees, the middle of the round showcases the evergreen wilderness for which Oregon is known. After the thirteenth, golfers surmount the ridge to arrive at the fourteenth with its astonishing views.

The tee ball drops dramatically back down to the meadow toward a little perched green, just 325 yards away. After three more holes in the meadow, the eighteenth rambles back up to finish high in the dunes.

I assumed management of this project for Coore & Crenshaw shortly after construction began. Fortunately, a cooperative effort with the resorts capable staff enabled me to continue shaping, lending a hand on holes such as these shown below.

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Bandon Trails under construction, with existing courses above

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The transitional third provided an important key to uniting the various habitats of Bandon Trails. The 549 yard par five tees off from the dunes across exposed sand to a fairway littered with bunkers and contour. Compliments of Wood Sabold Photography.

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While maneuvering about the central bunkers of the thirdís approach, the golfer must also consider its subtly perched green. The ball can be run gently up onto the putting surface, but rippling contours drop off to the right and approach shots played with too strong a hand are easily swept over the greens soft profile.

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A dune ridge folds diagonally across the landing area of the two-shot fourth. As such, all that was required at the green was this simple putting surface resting on the natural grade. Compliments of Wood Sabold Photography.

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The broad tenth, with its lacy bunkers and draped green, rests among the towering firs at the easternmost point on the course. Compliments of Wood Sabold Photography.

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A rare water hole for Bill and Ben, the 445 yard eleventh offers plenty of forgiveness all down the left side of this dogleg right. There is even a friendly slope available to run the ball in from the left. Nonetheless, this broad, gently contoured green is surprisingly elusive. Compliments of Wood Sabold Photography.

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Here is a view of the 325 yard fourteenth on a crisp autumn morning. I had the good fortune of shaping this hole in close collaboration with Ben. Whether because of or despite the controversy over fourteenís precarious green, both he and owner Mike Keiser elect it as their favorite hole on the course. Compliments of Wood Sabold Photography.

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Oneís tour of Bandon Trails is effectively concluded at the eighteenth. After wandering through the varied terrain over which the course is sprawled, the finishing hole returns to its inception among the dunes. Compliments of Wood Sabold Photography.

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People Are Talking:

"Dave Zinkand is an able-bodied associate of ours, and he is desirous of furthering his career in golf course architecture. He is thoughtful and thorough, and his skill with the "blade" has given us a great deal of satisfaction. Dave is patient and possesses enough skill to work out a problem with care and respect to detail - always working with the natural ground at his disposal.

We highly recommend Dave to whomever he might help, given his experience at working with varied and different locales."

- Ben Crenshaw